Celebrity Culture: Ripped…

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Celebrity Culture: Ripped…

Celebrity Culture:

Taylor Swift’s new “You Need to Calm Down” video did the unthinkable — it brought her together with former feud-mate Katy Perry — but there have been critics of the overall theme.” data-reactid=”15″ type=”text”>Taylor Swift’s new “You Need to Calm Down” video did the unthinkable — it brought her together with former feud-mate Katy Perry — but there have been critics of the overall theme.

Ellen DeGeneres, Adam Lambert, Laverne Cox, RuPaul, Jesse Tyler Ferguson and Billy Porter. Timed with Pride month, Swift sings about how “shade never made anybody less gay,” and name-checks GLAAD while imagery of same-sex marriage and drag performances play out. It ended with a call to sign a petition for the passage of the Equality Act.” data-reactid=”16″ type=”text”>Perry was just one celebrity making a cameo in the pop star’s song, which heavily featured LGBTQ stars, including the Queer Eye crew, Ellen DeGeneres, Adam Lambert, Laverne Cox, RuPaul, Jesse Tyler Ferguson and Billy Porter. Timed with Pride month, Swift sings about how “shade never made anybody less gay,” and name-checks GLAAD while imagery of same-sex marriage and drag performances play out. It ended with a call to sign a petition for the passage of the Equality Act.

While Swift using her platform to get political is applause-worthy — she had famously been politically neutral until speaking out against Republican Senator Marsha Blackburn in 2018 — many have issues with this song and video.

called it a “queasy double message” in which the “singer’s pro-gay single strangely compares her struggles with fame to more dangerous kinds of persecution.” The writer noted, “The entire song, indeed, subsumes queerness into Swift’s narratives. Its breathtaking argument: that famous people are persecuted in a way meaningfully comparable to queer people.”” data-reactid=”20″ type=”text”>The Atlantic called it a “queasy double message” in which the “singer’s pro-gay single strangely compares her struggles with fame to more dangerous kinds of persecution.” The writer noted, “The entire song, indeed, subsumes queerness into Swift’s narratives. Its breathtaking argument: that famous people are persecuted in a way meaningfully comparable to queer people.”

writes that Swift wants the song to be “a queer anthem,” yet it “also wants to sell you something.” It says she’s “speaking out in support of LGBTQ causes at a time that’s financially convenient, borrowing from subcultures that have already been proven to be lucrative (drag, for instance) and incorporating them into her brand.”” data-reactid=”21″ type=”text”>Vox writes that Swift wants the song to be “a queer anthem,” yet it “also wants to sell you something.” It says she’s “speaking out in support of LGBTQ causes at a time that’s financially convenient, borrowing from subcultures that have already been proven to be lucrative (drag, for instance) and incorporating them into her brand.”

writes that while Swift’s “gesture is nice,” her “attempt to marry the personal with the political is a baffling parallel. Equating online haters with the personal and societal struggle of LGBTQ+ people is, at best, tone deaf.”” data-reactid=”22″ type=”text”>In a piece about the song, Esquire writes that while Swift’s “gesture is nice,” her “attempt to marry the personal with the political is a baffling parallel. Equating online haters with the personal and societal struggle of LGBTQ+ people is, at best, tone deaf.”

Twitter is filled with similar sentiments. While there is a general appreciation for her attempt, they don’t think the execution was right.

I’m glad Taylor’s intentions are in the right place, but the misunderstanding of “shade” is criminal. Imagine seeing a Westboro Baptist Church “God Hates F*gs” sign and being like “oooh girl, the shade!”

— Chris Schleicher (@cschleichsrun) June 14, 2019

That Taylor Swift video is 100% using LGBT people as props come on….

— Lily (@kubrickzirconia) June 17, 2019

Maybe I’m just overly skeptical of Taylor Swift’s intentions, but her new music video feels a lot like when corporations slap rainbows on their packaging to cash in on Pride.

— Kait 🖤🦊 (@Fussy_Fox) June 17, 2019

Congratulations to Taylor Swift for figuring out a way to exploit gay pride for some recognition. 🏳️‍🌈

— Olivia (@OliviaKawaii) June 17, 2019

Wake up you brain dead morons!!! Celebrities and corporations don’t care about lgbt people they just want our money! Taylor Swift can suck my toes then I’ll believe she genuinely respects lgbt people :^)

— down with capitalism (@greenmoonbean) June 18, 2019

Y’all gonna let Taylor Swift exploit the queer community for views like that? During pride month? Ok

— Hayley ™️ (@xielxss) June 17, 2019

They new #TaylorSwift video is visually very fun, but just comes across as awkward and pandering. Like, thanks wealthy straight white woman for using a litany of LGBTQ+ people to get views, bolster your “image” and make money

— sticky griffin (@darcvaders) June 17, 2019

katy perry and taylor swift became friends just in time to exploit pride month that’s a funny coincidence

— lize (@cobrafinch) June 17, 2019

Though many appreciate that she’s an ally.

stop calling taylor swift a queerbaiter she’s always been a vocal lgbt supporters and several of the people in her latest music video are are actual friends.

— j (@ThotneySpears) June 18, 2019

Because Taylor has tons of celebraties celebrating our month. And, she spent a ton of money on a LGBT song, video. That’s an ally!

— Connie Bloom (@BloomConnell) June 18, 2019

Several pointed out that a video like this could have helped them when they were younger and struggling with their identity:

.@taylorswift13‘s new video “You Need To Calm Down” made me cry. No shame to admit. Didn’t have that type of support growing up. Can’t speak for the entire community, but I personally appreciate it and thank Taylor Swift. L pic.twitter.com/w70d77sk9p

— Tom & Lorenzo (@tomandlorenzo) June 17, 2019

i think taylor swift’s new video is cute and has a super important message? especially for her young fans who maybe don’t know as much about queer culture or have overwhelmingly conservative households. this would’ve meant the world to a younger, closeted me

— Matt Ford (@JMatthiasFord) June 18, 2019

Having my identity validated as a struggling queer kid by seeing all these g