Celebrity Health: Celebrity psychiatrist reveals the dangerous effects fame can have on mental health

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Celebrity Health: Celebrity psychiatrist reveals the dangerous effects fame can have on mental health

Celebrity Health:

Celebrity Health: ‘Fame is a bigger drug than ever’: Celebrity psychiatrist reveals the dangerous effects reality TV can have on mental health… after the deaths of Charlotte Dawson and Mike Thalassitis

By Nicole Douglas For Daily Mail Australia

Published: 23:21 EDT, 8 September 2019 | Updated: 23:32 EDT, 8 September 2019

A high-profile psychiatrist has exposed the dangerous effects chasing fame can have on a person’s mental health.

Dr Tanveer Ahmed, who has treated several celebrities during his career, told 9Honey that clinging to fame can have tragic psychological consequences.

He explained that some vulnerable young people apply for reality shows as a fast-track to fame, but find themselves in trouble when things don’t go to plan.

‘Fame is a bigger drug than ever’: A celebrity psychiatrist has revealed the dangerous effects reality TV can have on mental health… after the tragic deaths of Charlotte Dawson and Mike Thalassitis. Pictured: Mike Thalassitis on October 16, 2018 in London

‘Even those with potential talents elsewhere aim to be famous above worthwhile professional careers,’ he said. 

Dr Ahmed added that one of the reasons why shows such as Married At First Sight and The Bachelor employ on-set psychologists is because of the devastating after-effects of overnight fame. 

Last year, British reality TV fans were left shocked when Love Island star Mike Thalassitis, 26, took his own life after appearing on the show. 

His death came one year after 32-year-old Sophie Gradon, who had appeared on a previous season, also tragically died by suicide. 

Tragedy: Australia’s Next Top Model judge Charlotte Dawson died by suicide in 2014 following a long and public battle with depression

While not a contestant herself, Australia’s Next Top Model judge Charlotte Dawson died by suicide in 2014 following a long and public battle with depression. 

‘While I did not know them personally, it’s difficult not to think their psychological decline occurred at a time when their fame and beauty were perhaps of lesser value,’ Dr Tanveer Ahmed continued.

‘The lust for fame is a substitute for love and affection. We live at a time when [fame] appears within grasp for all of us via social media or reality TV, albeit fleetingly.’ 

‘I had no direction’: Several reality stars, who have not been treated by Dr Ahmed, have spoken about their experience of mental health issues in the past. Ex-Bachelor star Tiffany Scanlon admitted she was left ‘broke and lonely’ two years after she appeared on the show in 2016

Several Australian reality stars, who have not been treated by Dr Ahmed, have spoken about their experience of mental health issues in the past.

Former Bachelor star Tiffany Scanlon admitted she was left ‘broke and lonely’ two years after she appeared on the show in 2016.

‘At the end of 2018 I was broke, lonely, had no direction, a string of failed short romances, was anxious, angry and cynical, and blamed others,’ Tiffany recently wrote on Instagram.

‘When you live a lie, live against your values, pretend to be someone you’re not, try to follow others’ footsteps, place your value with someone else… it all ends one way: your own misery.’ 

‘I started getting help’: Married at First Sight star Tracey Jewel had to seek medical help in 2018 after receiving a backlash following her appearance on the matchmaking show

Meanwhile, Married at First Sight star Tracey Jewel had to seek medical help in 2018 after receiving a backlash following her appearance on the matchmaking show.

She claimed that being cyber bullied and trolled had sent her into a ‘head spin’ and she ‘couldn’t see a way out’ of her situation.

‘I’m not someone who has a history of depression, but I started getting help in April [2018] because the psychologist said I might have post-traumatic stress disorder because of everything I’d been through,’ she told New Idea last year. 

  • For confidential support in the UK, call the Samaritans on 116 123 or visit a local branch. See www.samaritans.org for details.
  • For confidential support in Australia, call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or visit www.lifeline.org.au. Alternatively, call Kids Helpline on 1800 55 1800

‘I didn’t see a way out’: Tracey claimed that being cyber bullied and trolled had sent her into a ‘head spin’ and she ‘couldn’t see a way out’ of her